Please Sign In or Create an account
Impact of depression on sexual activity and risk taking among french gay men seeking sex on internet

Impact of depression on sexual activity and risk taking among french gay men seeking sex on internet

The objective of this study was to analyse how depression influences sexual desires and activities of gay men to understand the co-occurrence of depressed mood, high sex drive and unprotected anal intercourse with casual partners (UAIC) among some individuals.  In 2004, French gay men visiting a major gay Internet site participated in an online survey assessing serological status, numbers of casual partners, sex drive and control over sex drive, UAIC, depression and its impact on sexual desire. 1932 men who had casual partners in the previous year were included in the analysis. HIV-negative men on average had 22 casual partners per annum, and 28% reported UAIC

Insertive UAIC was practised with 4.5 partners, and receptive UAIC with 4 partners. Sexual activity and risk-taking were substantially higher for HIV-positive men (M=46 partners, 58% UAIC), and HIV+ men had UAIC with more partners (insertive M=20, receptive M=22). Whereas depression lowered sexual desire among most gay men, a minority of men (22%) experienced the reverse effect. HIV+ men more often reported that depression strongly increased their sexual desires. These depressive sexual urges were found to increase sexual activity and reduce men’s control over their sex drive. The combined effects of depressed sexual urges, high level of sex-drive, and low control over sex-drive, explained 34% of the variance in risk behaviour in HIV-negative men and 56% of the variance in risk behaviour in HIV-positive men.   In some gay men, especially those who are HIV-positive, sexual activity seems to be used to cope with depressive moods. Sexual coping however significantly increases exposures to risk because it may result in sexual compulsivity and reduces the amount of control individuals have over their sex-drive. Tackling the issue of mental health amongst gay men is therefore an important challenge for the prevention of HIV.
Speakers: John De Wit
Conference: Demo
Areas of Interest / Categories: Anal Sex, Depression, Desire, Homosexuality, Prevention, Sexual Behaviour

Anal Sex

High prevalence, incidence and clearance of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) in homosexual men: early evidence from the Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC)

Homosexual men are at increased risk of anal cancer. Screening and treatment of the precursor, HSIL, has been advocated by some, but screening is not recommended in widely-accepted guidelines. We aimed to describe the prevalence, incidence, and clearance rates of anal HSIL, and association with human papillomavirus (HPV) status, in a community-recruited cohort of homosexual men.

High Resolution Anoscopy - Practice makes perfect

Background: Liquid based anal Papanicolaou smears, followed by High Resolution Anoscopy (HRA) guided biopsies are increasingly being advocated to identify areas of High Grade Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (HGAIN). We hypothesized that the ability to identify HGAIN would increase with experience of the anoscopist, and that comparison with contemporary Papanicolaou smears might yield insights into technical abilities.

Behavioural trends among Australian gay men pose increasing challenges for HIV prevention: findings from the Gay Community Periodic Surveys, 2003-1

Gay men remain the primary population affected by HIV in Australia. While recent attention has been focused on increasing HIV testing and the use of antiretroviral-based prevention to reduce infections, it is equally important to sustain safe sex and other risk reduction practices. Increases in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), for example, may counteract any beneficial changes in testing and treatment. 

Undetectable viral load is associated with increased unprotected anal intercourse in gay serodiscordant couples

In serodiscordant heterosexual couples, undetectable viral load (VL) is associated with a substantially reduced HIV transmission risk. No studies in gay male serodiscordant couples (SDCs) have been reported. 'Opposites Attract' is an ongoing cohort study of gay SDCs recruited via clinics and community-based advertising. HIV-Positive Partners (HPPs) have VL tested at baseline; HIV- Negative Partners (HNPs) have HIV antibody tests and report sexual behaviour and partner’s perceived VL. Associations between unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and VL were examined with logistic regression and Wilcoxon rank-sum test.

Practicalities of screening for anal cancer.

Digital rectal examination to screen for anal cancer in HIV positive men having sex with men (MSM)

Anal cancer is more common in MSM and even more common if they have HIV. Anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) appears to be the precursor and considerable effort is being directed toward evaluating the effectiveness of screening for and treating AIN to prevent anal cancer. This is analogous to the cervical screening programs in wealthy countries. But AIN screening and treatment differs from cervical screening and treatment in several key ways that may delay its introduction into routine clinical care.

The types of sexual activity of women and their sexual satisfaction, mental health and quality of relationships: A literature review

Penile-vaginal intercourse, masturbation, anal sex and oral sex may influence women’s sexual satisfaction, mental health and quality of relationships. This article is a review of the literature that critically investigates how the type of sexual activity affects these aspects of women’s lives.