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Neurofeedback for ADHD

Neurofeedback for ADHD

This study analysed Theta and Beta rhythms and Theta/Beta ratios to determine whether training was effective. Training focused on rewarding reductions in Theta activation and increases in Beta activation. Results found a significant change in cortical activation in 50% of participants by their 20th neurofeedback training session. Only one participant showed significant change by session 9 or 10, indicating that neurofeedback therapy would be unlikely to meet the requirements of the Australia government’s Better Access program, which limits government funding to ten sessions.

There were numerous challenges when working with data from a clinical setting and these challenges will be discussed along with recommendations for future researchers in this field.

Areas of Interest / Categories: ANSA, ANSA 2014

ANSA 2014

Case Studies with LORETA and Surface Z Score Neurofeedback Neurotherapy

Neurofeedback: Re-shaping the brain by applied brain plasticity

The brain is an information processing machine adjusting itself to the environment. Information processing can be defined as reducing uncertainty. It has been suggested that the brain developed from an evolutionary point of view once living creatures started moving around in a changing and thus uncertain environment. 

The use of tDCS for panic attacks

The use of tDCS in the treatment of neuropathic back pain: a case study

This presentation is a single case study involving the use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in the treatment of neuropathic back pain, with symptoms described in the lumbar-sacral region of the spine and down the left leg. An examination of the literature indicated that 40-50 percent improvement in pain perception might follow anodal stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1). Given the report of left leg symptoms, anodal stimulation was applied to the scalp over M1 on the left.

Non Invasive Neuromodulation (TMS, tDCS, tACD, tRNS, Loreta Neurofeedback): Working mechanisms

Many diseases have been linked to plastic changes and changes in activity and functional connectivity in the brain, which can be demonstrated by functional imaging, either using resting state imaging (EEG, MEG, fMRI), or by evoked activity. Many brain related diseases can therefore be seen as emerging properties of altered dynamically changing overlapping networks. Different neuromodulation techniques such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) have been used in an attempt to modify the abnormal activity and connectivity. Recently, also transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) have been introduced as neuromodulation tools, and LORETA neurofeedback is emerging as another non-invasive neuromodulation tool. Each of these neuromodulation techniques has a different proposed working mechanism which could provide help in selecting the right neuromodulation technique that best suits the pathology related functional imaging changes.

Neuroplasticity and Nonlinear Dynamics of Cerebral Development

The size and complexity of the nervous system makes it unlikely that changes in a single synapse result in significant changes in the behaviour of an interconnected neural network. Significant changes in neural network behaviour require changes in populations of synapses, defined as multiple synaptic modifications occurring simultaneously at multiple sites. The goal of the presentation is to present a neural network model of human cerebral ontogenesis and to use the model to explain the development of human EEG coherence over the postnatal period from 1.5 to 16 years of age.

Biochemical Imbalances that present as Mental Health Disorders