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The Ancient Greek Myth of Chiron: Further insights on the Wounded Healer

The Ancient Greek Myth of Chiron: Further insights on the Wounded Healer

Aim 1 – A follow-on from Andrew Samuels’ workshop on the wounded healer by reviewing the Greek myth of Chiron and what it reveals about the underlying psychology of the wounded healer that can inform psychotherapeutic practice.

Aim 2 – A follow-on from Jacinta Frawley’s workshop on dreams using such an approach to the myth’s storyline.
The myths from ancient Greece last the test of time because they represent psychological elements common to the human condition and with which persons can identify. Chiron as a healer indicates that to be effective, means being wounded oneself. The myth will be overviewed using a dream interpretation approach so as to explicate its underlying psychology. As such, any later scene (Chiron being hit by Heracles’ arrow) is seen as the ‘effect’ of a previous ’cause’, that is, Chiron’s traumas in infancy since he had been abandoned by his father (who feared the exposure of his infidelity) and also by his mother who abhorred his body with its animal instincts. It is these woundings which led to Chiron’s half man/half horse constitution. The wounded healer dynamic is here indicated. Life’s stumblings would alert the contemporary therapist to their own need for healing, but their early childhood material cannot be overlooked as a contributing factor. In this way, the knowing and processing of one’s own wounds at all levels means the sufferer can facilitate the taking away of suffering.