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The Impact of Rejected Asylum Application on the Mental Health Asylum Seekers Amongst Farsi-Dari Speaking in Australia.

The Impact of Rejected Asylum Application on the Mental Health Asylum Seekers Amongst Farsi-Dari Speaking in Australia.

OBJECTIVE:
To examine the impact of the refugee decision outcome on asylum seekers mental health amongst a cohort of Farsi Dari speaking in Australia.

BACKGROUND AND AIM:
In August 2012 the Australian government suspended the processing of 35,000 refugee claims for asylum seekers arriving in Australian by boat that has resulted in prolonged delays in the processing of their refugee’s claims. Most of the rejected asylum seekers believe they will face the risk of torture and risking of being placed into prison if repatriation in the home country. This study focuses on the role of the rejected asylum applications on factors of mental problems and living difficulties.

MATERIALS AND METHOD:
We used data collected as part of the Reassure Project a prospective cohort study of 411 Farsi- Dari-Speaking immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers who have arrived in Australia since 2010. One-way ANOVA was used to compare PTS, depression symptoms and living difficulties by visa categories along with contrasts to compare people who had been rejected to people on bridging visas. We examined symptoms of depression and PTSD, along with number of living difficulties at 10 months.

RESULTS:
Fourteen participants reported having a rejected asylum application across the first 12 months of the study, 72 bridging visa, 43 temporary protection, 37 permanent humanitarian, while 59 were permanent non-humanitarian entrant residents. There were
significant differences between groups in PTS (F (4,220), depression symptoms (p < 0.001), living difficulties (p < 0.001). In addition, people with rejected visas reported significantly higher PTS (p = 0.038), depression (p = 0.013) living difficulties (p = 0.048) than people on bridging visas.

CONCLUSION:
Mental health and living difficulties of asylum seekers extremely affected by the refusal of asylum applications.

  • School of Psychiatry – University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia,
  • University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia