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The dance of lullabies: integrating music therapy, sensori-motor and play activities in working with refugee and asylum seeker infants and their parents

The dance of lullabies: integrating music therapy, sensori-motor and play activities in working with refugee and asylum seeker infants and their parents

In this presentation Rosemary Signorelli will use case vignettes to illustrate work with infants and their parents and caregivers. This work is influenced by the Attachment, Self-Regulation and Competence (ARC) model, the developmental models of Bruce Perry and Stanley Greenspan, trauma recovery models and music therapy literature. The parent is enabled to use music, movement and play to reduce the possible impact of trauma, and to influence their baby’s socio-emotional, physical, cognitive and language development, in the peak period of brain plasticity. The parent learns new ways to respond to the baby’s emotional or regulatory needs in the moment, and to move easily between calming, stimulating and engaging activities. This shared musical ‘dance’ between parent and baby strengthens their bond, and facilitates their growth and recovery.


STARTTS 2012

The neuroscience of psychotherapy : Healing the Social Brain

This eight parts seminar explores psychotherapy and the social brain with a special emphasis on the causes and consequences of trauma. As a foundation, the evolution, development, and neuroanatomy of the brain with the goal of highlighting its vulnerability to dysregulation and dissociation are discussed. In it we recognise and better understand the neural networks responsible for stress and trauma and the challenge of keeping the government of systems which comprise our brains integrated and functioning smoothly. Then how psychotherapy, in its multiple forms, attempts to reshape the brain in the service of mental health is discussed. And finally,the process of healthy aging, especially for therapists who are confronted with trauma on a day-to-day basis is explored.

The neuroscience of psychotherapy : The Healthy Aging Brain

This eight parts seminar explores psychotherapy and the social brain with a special emphasis on the causes and consequences of trauma. As a foundation, the evolution, development, and neuroanatomy of the brain with the goal of highlighting its vulnerability to dysregulation and dissociation are discussed. In it we recognise and better understand the neural networks responsible for stress and trauma and the challenge of keeping the government of systems which comprise our brains integrated and functioning smoothly. Then how psychotherapy, in its multiple forms, attempts to reshape the brain in the service of mental health is discussed. And finally,the process of healthy aging, especially for therapists who are confronted with trauma on a day-to-day basis is explored.

The neuroscience of psychotherapy : Simple and Complex PTSD

This eight part seminar explores psychotherapy and the social brain with a special emphasis on the causes and consequences of trauma. As a foundation, the evolution, development, and neuroanatomy of the brain with the goal of highlighting its vulnerability to dysregulation and dissociation are discussed. In it we recognise and better understand the neural networks responsible for stress and trauma and the challenge of keeping the government of systems which comprise our brains integrated and functioning smoothly. Then how psychotherapy, in its multiple forms, attempts to reshape the brain in the service of mental health is discussed. And finally,the process of healthy aging, especially for therapists who are confronted with trauma on a day-to-day basis is explored.

Post-traumatic Growth: Is there evidence for changing our practice?

Positive psychological changes and growth beyond previous levels of functioning are characteristics of a phenomenon described as Posttraumatic Growth (PTG). Tedeschi, Park & Calhoun (1998) identified 5 outcomes of PTG: increased appreciation of life; sense of new possibilities in life; increased personal strength; improvement in close personal relationships; and positive spiritual change. More recently, PTG has been proposed as a coping style, as well as a coping outcome.

Healing traumatic nightmares using sandplay therapy.

Nightmares are a common and distressing symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet frequently resistant to treatment. The relationship between traumatic experience and dream