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Social and Economic Returns of Empowering Youth Participation in Voluntary Work in Civil Society Organisations in the Sultanate of Oman

Social and Economic Returns of Empowering Youth Participation in Voluntary Work in Civil Society Organisations in the Sultanate of Oman

The current age of economic and social transformations has witnessed the development of voluntary work with its new philosophy and concepts which changed from being charity work to becoming a cornerstone of sustained development of the society. Volunteering has a key role in enhancing the values of people’s participation, social responsibility, integrity, donation, and group belongingness. Most societies seek to empower youth to participate in voluntary work in all aspects of life and in all organisations, in the light of empowerment domains which include participation in decision making, independence, professional development, effectiveness, status description, and efficacy.

A number of research studies reveal that there is still some weakness in the belief of youth voluntary participation with significant dependence on governmental efforts. These beliefs lead to the youth’s distance from voluntary work. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) play a vital role in caring for youth and development of their skills through participation in decision making particularly as governmental organisations fail to fulfil the needs and demands of youth due to low awareness and motivation among youth about social and economic returns of volunteering. This study aims to explore such returns and how they can motivate the youth towards voluntary work. This paper attempts to identify the social and economics returns of youth voluntary work in the activities of NGOs. The paper also makes recommendations to empower youth voluntary work in the Sultanate of Oman.

Areas of Interest / Categories: BISBP 2016, Child and Adolescent Health

BISBP 2016

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Dr Venkat Pulla founder and President of Brisbane Institute of Strength Based Practice introduces Strengths Based Practices (SBPs), which concentrates on the inherent strengths of individuals, families groups and organisations deploying peoples' personal strengths to aid their recovery and empowerment. SBPs are empowering alternatives to traditional methods with individuals, group or organisational work. SBPs refrain from allowing crippling, labelling and stigmatised language.

Introduction to Strengths Based Practice

Dr Venkat Pulla founder and President of Brisbane Institute of Strength Based Practice introduces Strengths Based Practices (SBPs), which concentrates on the inherent strengths of individuals, families groups and organisations deploying peoples' personal strengths to aid their recovery and empowerment. SBPs are empowering alternatives to traditional methods with individuals, group or organisational work. SBPs refrain from allowing crippling, labelling and stigmatised language.

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Building helplines and caring for missing children: a community project

Kahte hai dhoondne se toh khudaa bi milta hai: If one searches, you can even find God. Every 30 seconds, a child goes missing in India and majority of them are girls and from poor socio-economic background (Singh, K.P, 2014). Referring to government figures accepting that only 45 per cent of them are fortunate to reach their homes, the Supreme Court observed that; “Nobody seems to care about missing children. This is the irony”, (TNN, 2014). 

Social and Economic Returns of Empowering Youth Participation in Voluntary Work in Civil Society Organisations in the Sultanate of Oman

The current age of economic and social transformations has witnessed the development of voluntary work with its new philosophy and concepts which changed from being charity work to becoming a cornerstone of sustained development of the society. Volunteering has a key role in enhancing the values of people’s participation, social responsibility, integrity, donation, and group belongingness. Most societies seek to empower youth to participate in voluntary work in all aspects of life and in all organisations, in the light of empowerment domains which include participation in decision making, independence, professional development, effectiveness, status description, and efficacy.