Please Sign In or Create an account
Building Health Capital – An Integrated Approach to Refugee Health: lessons learned from refugee health services in South East Qld over the past 20 years.

Building Health Capital – An Integrated Approach to Refugee Health: lessons learned from refugee health services in South East Qld over the past 20 years.

Mater Health, Brisbane, Australia, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
BACKGROUND AND AIMS:
Access to the right health care, at the right time, in the right place is central to good resettlement especially for survivors of torture and trauma. Identifying the barriers and solution to service access and incorporating a community perspective are key to innovation and integration of care. Over the past 20 years’ specialist refugee health services have emerged however it is equally important to consider the partnership with non-specialised health services in primary care and with refugee communities. Specialist services cannot exist in a vacuum and require effective mechanisms to link with the generalist health system.


METHODOLOGY:
The paper will provide a synopsis of the models of care for refugee health with a focus on implementing and evaluating an integrated care approach. In particular, the presentation will outline the implementation of a colocation model as an example of building refugee health capacity in generalist primary care services. Findings from qualitative and quantitative data collected from primary care over the last 5 years including feedback from health professionals and communities will be presented.


CHALLENGES/IMPLICATIONS:
By examining the elements of integrated care it is possible to analyse the highly complex dynamics that facilitate accessible, coordinated and quality care. Challenges include, sustaining partnerships with multiple primary care services in local settlement areas, preventing siloes and fragmented care and building trust with communities. The findings will inform mechanisms which support specialist services to effectively partner with communities and generalist services to deliver innovative care.


CONCLUSION:
Specialist refugee health services play an important role but need to effectively link with generalist health services for truly integrated, quality care.

Speakers: Donata Sackey