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The psychosocial genomics of sleep, dreaming, memory formation and consolidation: Making meaning from potent experience

The psychosocial genomics of sleep, dreaming, memory formation and consolidation: Making meaning from potent experience

The processing of our daily potent, enriched and stimulating experiences during sleep and dreaming has been well investigated in recent years at the conscious and neuronal level. Now it is being examined at the deeper levels of gene expression and epigenetic processes. It is known that we are designed to respond and adapt to changing circumstances. Our behaviour, and even our biology changes. Changes also occur at the very fundamental level of our DNA. There has been great interest, recently, in neuroplasticity and now we have insight into gene plasticity. What impact does gene plasticity have on our biological function and behavioural expression? What influence does the mind have? What do we know from the research into these processes and what might we predict – or perhaps dream – into the future? In the same way that neuroscience has opened doorways of progress into the way we practice psychotherapy, so will an understanding of these fundamental processes of activity dependent gene expression. Research from various quarters over the past decade plus the recent experiments and research of the International Psychosocial Research Group will be presented. Beneath what we can consciously grasp is a flawing river of biochemistry that is, perhaps for the moment, far more engaged with our dreams than our will.

Speakers: Richard Hill
Conference: Demo
Areas of Interest / Categories: Neuroplasticity, Psychotherapy

Neuroplasticity

The neuroscience of psychotherapy : The Healthy Aging Brain

This eight parts seminar explores psychotherapy and the social brain with a special emphasis on the causes and consequences of trauma. As a foundation, the evolution, development, and neuroanatomy of the brain with the goal of highlighting its vulnerability to dysregulation and dissociation are discussed. In it we recognise and better understand the neural networks responsible for stress and trauma and the challenge of keeping the government of systems which comprise our brains integrated and functioning smoothly. Then how psychotherapy, in its multiple forms, attempts to reshape the brain in the service of mental health is discussed. And finally,the process of healthy aging, especially for therapists who are confronted with trauma on a day-to-day basis is explored.

Neurodharma: Exploring Buddhist Themes in the Brain

 The Buddha taught that everything arises and passes away due to causes and conditions. The brain is the final common pathway of all the causes and conditions that shape human suffering –

Psychosocial genomics and interpersonal neurobiology the meeting of mind and body

Neuroplasticity is one of the most exciting breakthroughs in neuroscience. We have developed a deeper understanding and appreciation of the psychotherapeutic process. More recently, a new concept has emerged 'gene plasticity'. Genetics and epigenetics enable an even deeper understanding of how the mind, body and brain interact. Most importantly, this interaction is directly related to experience.

Self Directed Neuroplasticity

Neuroplasticity ranks as one of the most exciting findings to emerge from the “Decade of the Brain” as it opened doors to a number of emerging interventions for altering brain functions.

Neurofeedback: Re-shaping the brain by applied brain plasticity

The brain is an information processing machine adjusting itself to the environment. Information processing can be defined as reducing uncertainty. It has been suggested that the brain developed from an evolutionary point of view once living creatures started moving around in a changing and thus uncertain environment. 

Brain Talk: Integrated therapy that includes a discussion about the brain with the client Part 8 of 8

This seminar will include suggestions on how to communicate to clients about the brain. Therapists can engage clients by discussing the concept of neuroplasticity, and present them with evidence-based techniques with which they can “rewire” their brains. Specifically, therapists can focus on how anxiety and/or depression are processed by the brain and what the client needs to do to become less anxious and/or depressed. Clients are more responsive when they hear less theoretical jargon and more concrete brain-based explanations about their problems. Since people who are suffering from anxiety and/or depression are so overwhelmed by their symptoms, they find it hard to remember what to do that would make them feel better. Therefore, when discussing each disorder it can be useful to describe a mnemonic that can be used with clients so that they can remember the important behaviours that need to be made to deal with their anxiety or depressive symptoms. The brain serves as the common denominator for all approaches and can be used to explain particular approaches to clients.

Brain Talk: Integrated therapy that includes a discussion about the brain with the client Part 1 of 8

This seminar will include suggestions on how to communicate to clients about the brain. Therapists can engage clients by discussing the concept of neuroplasticity, and present them with evidence-based techniques with which they can “rewire” their brains. Specifically, therapists can focus on how anxiety and/or depression are processed by the brain and what the client needs to do to become less anxious and/or depressed. Clients are more responsive when they hear less theoretical jargon and more concrete brain-based explanations about their problems. Since people who are suffering from anxiety and/or depression are so overwhelmed by their symptoms, they find it hard to remember what to do that would make them feel better. Therefore, when discussing each disorder it can be useful to describe a mnemonic that can be used with clients so that they can remember the important behaviours that need to be made to deal with their anxiety or depressive symptoms. The brain serves as the common denominator for all approaches and can be used to explain particular approaches to clients.