The influence of Minority Stress, Resilience and Social Support on Psychological Distress in Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual People

The influence of Minority Stress, Resilience and Social Support on Psychological Distress in Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual People

2014-10-01 00:00:00

The aims of the present study were to examine which of the minority stressors (discrimination, perceived stigma, personal homonegativity/bionegativity, gay/lesbian/affirmation and concealment from family and world) was most strongly related to depression and to examine the role of protective factors (social support from friends, family and significant others, and resilience) on the relationship between minority stress and depression.

A total of 285 participants (52% male, 48% female) aged from 18 – 64 (M = 24.95, SD = 7.89) took part in the study. Of those participants, 143 identified as gay or lesbian and 142 identified as bisexual. In gay men and lesbian women, the unique significant predictors included personal homonegativity and resilience. In bisexual participants, significant predictors included perceived stigma, personal bionegativity, discrimination, perceived stigma, resilience, social support from friends, and social support from significant others.

These findings demonstrate that personal negativity about an individual’s homosexual or bisexual orientation is important when considering risk for depression. In both groups, resilience was an important protective factor while social support from friends and significant others are both important for bisexual participants.

Speakers: Katie Ebacioni
Areas of Interest / Categories: Society of Australian Sexology 2014
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Society of Australian Sexology 2014

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