Please Sign In or Create an account
Creating conditions for rapid, positive change.

Creating conditions for rapid, positive change.

Often Change Management processes use a problem—solving approach to change, focusing on defining problems, setting targets, planning strategies and overcoming roadblocks. People get busy with residual consequences with what’s not working and do not appear to be in a position to take any risks for the fear of failures. Dr. Venkat Pulla recommends using Appreciative Process frameworks that overcome these side effects and allow organizational leaders to take a different approach to directing change. It is unlikely that managers can ‘implement ‘ cultural change. Attempts to install a preferred culture generally have unintended consequences and often make things worse. (Kotter & Heskett, 1992; Ogbonna, 1993) All we think, managers could do is unleash culture change and hope for the best.

Collectively focusing on what you want more of, inquiring into the best of what people know and care about, appears to be one of them. You can’t control Culture Change But a Focus on the Positive can usually be trusted to make things better. ‘We don’t try to fix what’s broken, instead we deploy Appreciative process frameworks to offer to transitions and the dynamics of change by broadcasting what is working’ Dr Pulla says that ‘you couldn’t control culture change but a focus on the positive can usually result in better things’. Appreciative change processes engage the people who need to be part of improving the organization in identifying the best of what they do, celebrating and learning from it, working with people’s internal motivation to be competent, and to give their best to the organization and be called successful.

Conference: Sarajevo 2011