The evolution of sexual desire: A view to gender differences

The evolution of sexual desire: A view to gender differences

2012-07-01 00:00:00

Sexual desire is a key factor that predicts and motivates sexual activities and behaviors. Gender differences in sexual desire have been explained and predicted for example by evolution theory and social contructionism. Seldom have gender differences in sexual desire measured and analysed in nationally representative sex surveys. Sex surveys based on random samples from national population registers have been conducted in Finland in 1971, 1992, 1999, and 2007.

They are representative of the total population within the age range of 18-54 years in 1971 (N=2152) and 18-74 years in 1992 (N=2250), 1999 (N=1496), and 2007 (N=2590). Due to different data collection techniques response rates were lower in 1999 and 2007 than in 1971 and 1992. Gender differences in sexual desire did not decrease from 1970s to 2000s. Compared to women, men feel sexual desire 2-3 times more often, they would like to have sexual intercourse more often and they would prefer more frequent intercourse in their relationships more often. In addition, women report frequent lack in their own sexual desire four times more often than men. Compared to other women, women with low sexual desire less often consider sex life important for the happiness in their relationship, they quite seldom consider their sexual intercourse very pleasant, and they more often have some problems in their sexual communication and interaction with their partner. These and other findings of gender differences in sexual desire will be discussed also in a theoretical framework.

Conference: WAS Goteberg 2009
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