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Gender, Genital Alteration, and Beliefs About Bodily Harm

Gender, Genital Alteration, and Beliefs About Bodily Harm

In 2015, a senior British judge, Sir James Munby, stated that nontherapeutic childhood male circumcision must be a “significant harm”. His reasoning was that the law currently treats all forms of nontherapeutic cutting or alteration of female genitalia as significantly harmful, including forms that are less invasive than male circumcision (such as “pricking” of the clitoral hood). In his words, “to dispute that the more invasive procedure [i.e., male circumcision] involves the significant harm involved in the less invasive [female] procedures would seem almost irrational”. Against this view, one could note that most men who were circumcised in infancy do not appear to regard themselves as “significantly harmed” by the procedure, seeing it instead as “normal” in their culture or community.

However, most women who have undergone even “extreme” forms of nontherapeutic female genital cutting similarly do not regard themselves as harmed, since such cutting is normative in their culture(s)and is viewed as a means to bodily enhancement. In the latter case, it is often argued that the typical lack of self-perceived harm may be due to a paucity of relevant information (i.e., “they do not know what they are missing”), as well as a greater likelihood of believing various myths about unmodified female genitalia (e.g., the myth that the clitoris, if not cut, will grow to the size of a penis). Might a similar explanation apply to the case of men who do not regard themselves as harmed by circumcision?

In this talk, I report the results of a new empirical study exploring the association between American men’s satisfaction with being circumcised and their endorsement of false beliefs concerning natural penile anatomy and the effects of circumcision.

Speakers: Dr Brian Earp
Areas of Interest / Categories: WAS 2017

WAS 2017

An Introduction to the Spectrum of Short Term Approaches in the Conversational Model

Although the Conversational Model began as an approach to seeing difficult patients, often on the wards as well as outpatients and of varying length, it became more associated in Australia with intensive long term therapy for complex trauma. This talk will instead outline some of the various shorter term applications of the CM including: 1) ultra- brief work in the ED, clinic, wards or general practice; 2) Formal Psychodynamic Interpersonal Therapy (PIT) of 4-8 sessions and its evidence base; 3) the CM as a model of trauma-informed care for individual clinicians and team, including acute care teams and their supervision.

The Etiology of Sexual Desire Disorder (Spanish)

Introduction and objective: Women with disorder of sexual desire persistently manifest clinically significant discomfort with distress because of decreased sexual interest / arousal or due to significant interference with quality of life, well-being and their interpersonal relationships (1). Prevalence studies on sexual dysfunction in the general female population suggest that it affects 10% to 52% of women (2), and low sexual desire seems to be the most common sexual dysfunction, with a prevalence ranging from 8% to 30% (3,4). Its etiology is complex and may include biological, psychological and sociocultural factors. For this reason, when addressing this dysfunction, it is an important objective to know and consider the different factors that can affect it to make a correct diagnosis.

Integrating Body, Mind, Heart and Spirit: A Holistic Approach to Sex Therapy and Supervision

Female Sexual Pain Disorders: It's No Longer Only in Their Heads!

For many years, women with sexual pain were told that it is “in their heads” and were sent off for counselling sessions. These sessions were probably beneficial on many levels, but it seldom cured the pain. Scientific research and clinical practice have since taught us that there are, in most cases, very specific medical conditions causing the pain these women are experiencing. All over the world, more and more clinicians are taking the hands of their multidisciplinary team members and are starting to treat these women holistically and effectively.

Who's in the Spotlight? Interrogating Sexuality and Disorder in ICD-11

Next year the World Health Organisation intends to approve the ICD-11 diagnostic manual; the first ICD revision in over a quarter century. Some of the changes proposed in areas of sexual disorder and sexual health are highly controversial. In this presentation I examine some of the proposals, drawing on my experience as a member of the WHO Working Group from which most of the proposals have come. Focussing on proposed revisions to the following ICD-10 diagnostic blocks; ’psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation’ (proposal to remove the block entirely); ’disorders of sexual preference’ (proposals for significant revisions), and ’gender identity disorders’ (proposals for renaming and relocation). I adopt a critical perspective, and will share previously unavailable information with the audience.

History of the Czech Scientific Sexology

From its very beginnings, the Czech sexology has been closely linked with the field of medicine. As early as 1921, the Institute for Sexual Pathology (later Institute of Sexology) was founded in Prague by Dermatovenerological clinic of the Faculty of Medicine of Charles University. In 1935, the main representative of the Czech sexological school, Professor Josef Hynie (1900-1989) was put in charge of the Institute for Sexology. In 1940, Hynie published his monography ‘Introduction to Medical Sexology’. Josef Hynie headed the Sexological Institute at the School of Medicine of Charles University until 1974.

Clinical Implications of Hair Removal from Female Genitalia

The partial or complete removal of genital hair is common among women from many cultures. This practice may have clinical implications for genital health. The objective was to assess the relationship of female genital hair removal with genital symptoms. Cross-sectional internet-based survey which invited women over 18 years-old to participate. Women were asked to respond anonymously to an online questionnaire. The data were accessed through an internet based tool and stored in a database created with Microsoft Excel 360 software. Multiple correspondence analysis was performed to determine the relationships of different variables. The statistical analysis used the PROC CORRESP procedure of SAS software version 9.2.