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Mystery, Uncertainty and Complexity in Embryo Donation Counselling in Aotearoa  New Zealand

Mystery, Uncertainty and Complexity in Embryo Donation Counselling in Aotearoa New Zealand

Results indicate that counsellors regard ED as a complex practice with unknown, uncertain and enduring implications arising from the genetic link between donors and offspring. They conceptualise their role as enabling and supporting relationships between donors and recipients, and exploring the complex interactions that occur. Counsellors voiced concern about the nature of their roles, including their responsibility for outcomes and the conflation of assessment and counselling roles in open donation. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to counsellors, donors and recipients, children of the families, and ED policy guidelines.

Speakers: Dr Mark Thorpe
Areas of Interest / Categories: WCP 2015, WCP 2016

WCP 2016

Psychoanalytic Sensibility in a Behavioural World: Supervising Intern Counselling Psychologists in Aotearoa New Zealand

Psychoanalysis passed its heyday in the seventies and has been usurped by short term cognitive-behavioural therapies. Despite this trend, recently there has been a small growth of psychoanalytic psychotherapy in Aotearoa New Zealand. This presentation describes my experience of employing a psychoanalytic sensibility in teaching and supervising intern counselling psychologists in a cognitive-behaviourally dominated university system. Vignettes are used to illustrate where differences between the psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioural worldviews arose in supervision and how I attempted to deal with them.

Full Contact Couple Therapy

Most couple therapy models do not produce therapy that worked for couples. Their techniques, including visualisation, positive dialogues and homework as utilised for example by Emotion Focused Couple Therapy (EFCT) (Greenberg & Johnson 1988, Gottman based couple therapy (Declare & Gottman 2001), and Imago therapy by Hendrix and Hunt (Hendrix and Hunt, 2003; Hendrix and Hunt, 2005), have led to little successful outcome. These techniques are not able to address the multisensory amygdala based ruptures in relationships. The techniques employed by most couple therapy models are prefrontal lobe based i.e. they engage couples' prefrontal lobe only. The activations patterns of each other's amygdala by each party of the couple who seek therapy remain unchanged despite going through most of these therapies.

Evaluating Group Therapy Process through the Clients’ Feedback

The study purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of solution-focused brief group therapy based on the clients’ feedback about the process. The evaluation was to ensure that from the client’s perspective they were experiencing quality and effective service (Sharry, 2007). The research samples were from 30 undergraduate students of Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia of the 5th semester chosen by simple random sampling technique. They received 5 sessions of group therapy including termination and follow-up session. The data collection used the instrument adapted from Duncan and Miller’s (2000) (Sharry, 2007) supported by observation and interview.

Encounters Between the Psychoanalytic Community and the U.S.-American Intelligence Community 1940-1945 – A Short History of an Unexpected Liaison

Beginning in 1940, members of the US-American psychoanalytic community began to collaborate with the US-Intelligence Community (IC). Early activities (1940-1945) focused on the immediate threat of Nazi Germany, fascist Italy, and their imperial Japanese ally and included studies on a variety of anti-axis propaganda issues, e.g., home front radio broadcasts, analysis of enemy broadcasts, studies on domestic morale, analysis of enemy national character etc. Moreover, psychoanalysts used clinical data retained from ongoing analyses to be used by the IC in search of certain patterns of totalitarian attitudes in patients which might be counteracted by psychoanalysis or by psychoanalytically informed propaganda programs.

Meditative flow-Psychotherapy: cognitive paradigm shift that offers positive outcomes in solving relationship issues

Relationship issues affect everyone. Much research has been carried out to resolve them through the engagements of various therapy and counselling techniques. Nonetheless, before the advent of counselling and psychotherapy protocols, those with relationship issues had sought the advice and guidance from some respected members of the families, village chiefs, temple and church elders or even those with shamanic practices. Today there are trends towards “spiritual” solutions to heal and repair those relationship issues. The presenter through his personal experience in this topic had found that one aspect of meditation - guided meditation could prove to be more useful than general or even mindfulness meditation modalities. The presenter, who is presently engaged in providing counselling for those incarcerated, had found that the practise of “guided meditation” not only relaxes the clients but could be used to transform their views (attitudes) and meaning of their own journey in life also. “Guided meditation” evokes the meditators’ visual, audio and kinetic faculties.

The Silent Language of Art Psychotherapy: making meaning of symbols

Informed by hermeneutic philosophical traditions, this will be a presentation of a brief art psychotherapy intervention from a phenomenological perspective. The idea of “meaning-making” is constructed from a phenomenological interpretation of art making, revealing psychological life as defined by Jung to be “the totality of all psychic processes, conscious as well as unconscious”.

Family Therapeutic Alliance and Collective Family Therapy

Exploring into local collectivist Malays culture led the researchers to construct the Family Therapeutic Alliance (FTA) which is an invaluable therapeutic source of authority applicable as the underlying element in multicultural psychotherapy. FTA was used in a longitudinal study of relapse prevention among the Malay collectivist recovering addicts and their family that has produced a positive outcome. Four recovering addicts and their families were invited to form four study groups with an initial goal of establishing FTA, and later on, to maintain their alliances. Eight sessions of Collective Family Therapy using a multicultural approach that adopt the basic element of psychotherapy and critical values of the clients was used as the treatment approach.